Newly Elected Austrian Leader Reveals Plans To ‘Crush’ The New World Order

31-year-old Sebastian Kurz has declared victory in Austria’s national election on Sunday making him the youngest leader on the planet.

Kurz has also revealed his plans to destroy the New World Order as he outlines his policies that have been interpreted as ‘anti-immigrant’ in a bid to leave the European Union like the UK.Kurz, eurosceptic Conservative, and globalist worst nightmare said: “I would, of course, like to form a stable government. If that cannot be done then there are other options.”

“Today is not about triumphing over others. But today is the day for real change in our country.

Today has given us a strong mandate to change this country, and I thank you for that.””We were handed a great response from the voters, and we should all be aware of it. We should also be aware that a lot of people have put their hopes into our movement.”

“I can promise you that I will fight with all my strength and all my commitment for change in this country, and I want to invite you all to come along this path together with me.”

According To the DailyMail: As well as his pledge on payouts to migrants, Kurz wants to slash Austria’s red tape and keep the EU out of national affairs.

At 31, Kurz is young even by the standards of Europe’s recent youth movement, which saw Macron enter the Elysee Palace at the age of 39 and Christian Lindner, 38, lead Germany’s liberal Free Democrats (FDP) back into the Bundestag.

Kurz and Lindner showed that young new faces can inject dynamism into old establishment parties that have lost their way with voters.

Kurz rebranded the OVP as the New People’s Party and changed its colours from black to turquoise.

Lindner used trendy black-and-white campaign posters that showed him staring at his smartphone to revitalise the FDP’s image.

Macron, who formed his own political movement, was able to paint himself as a rebel outsider despite having served for four years under failed French Socialist Francois Hollande.

And in Italy, where the two top candidates in next year’s election are likely to be Luigi Di Maio, the new 31-year-old leader of the upstart 5-Star movement and former prime minister Matteo Renzi, who at 42 looks old by Europe’s new standards.

By taking a hard line on immigration that left little daylight between him and the far-right Freedom Party (FPO), 31-year-old Foreign Minister Kurz managed to propel his People’s Party to first place and draw some support away from an FPO buoyed by Europe’s migration crisis.

Both parties increased their share of the vote from the last parliamentary election in 2013, marking a sharp shift to the right. Chancellor Christian Kern’s Social Democrats were in a close race with the FPO for second place.

Today Kurz was pictured voting in the Austrian capital Vienna alongside his girlfriend Susanne Thier – a finance ministry worker who he met at the age of 18.

Without revealing which way he was leaning on coalition talks, the 31-year-old told his supporters: ‘It is our task to work with all others for our country.’Austria, a wealthy country of 8.7 million people that stretches from Slovakia to Switzerland, was a gateway into Germany for more than 1 million people during the migration crisis that began in 2015.

Many of them were fleeing war and poverty in the Middle East and elsewhere.Austria also took in roughly one percent of its population in asylum seekers in 2015, one of the highest proportions on the continent.Many voters say the country was overrun.

Kurz’s strategy of focusing on that issue appears to have paid off.Kurz, named party leader only in May, has been careful to keep his coalition options open, but he called an end to the current alliance with the Social Democrats, forcing Sunday’s snap election.

He has pledged to shake up Austrian politics, dominated for decades by coalitions between those two parties.Kern, however, said he intended to stay on as party leader.

Asked if the loss would have an impact on his political career, Kern said: ‘No, I have said I will stay in politics for 10 years and there are nine years to go.’

The Social Democrats (SPO) have also opened the door to forming coalitions with the FPO, meaning the far-right party may be able to play the two parties off against each other during coalition talks.

But it is highly unlikely that the Social Democrats would ally with the FPO if the SPO came third.

A clear picture of the race for second place may not be available until Monday, given the large number of postal votes – roughly one in seven – most of which will not be counted until then.



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