Mysterious Antique Sphinx Discovered In The Bahamas

sphinx

A team of underwater archaeologists studying an ancient shipwreck of unknown origin near the eastern coast of the Bahamas, have made an astonishing discovery: a large stone statue resembling greatly in shape and design, the Egyptian Great Sphinx.

“We are not absolutely certain at the moment, as to what this discovery actually means” explains James Neilson, an historian part of the research team. “The erosion caused by the natural elements and the various corrals and lifeforms who settled on it, has been disturbing our scientific dating attempts, but the nature of the mineral used in its construction confirms beyond the shadow of a doubt that the statue is of Middle Eastern origin.”

The archaeologists who made the discovery, confirm that this one and a half ton basalt monument,  could actually be of Egyptian origin. The chemical analysis of the stone demonstrated that it was almost certainly extracted from a quarry near Wadi Rahanu, an Egyptian region known for its quarrying industry since 3500 BC. The basis of the statue seem to have carried an inscription, but the erosion made it impossible to decipher or identify without further testing and examination.

The original analysis of the surroundings revealed that it could be have been laying in the spot where it was discovered, for more than 2500 years. These results, when added together, seem very surprising. Most modern historians consider the ancient Egyptians were rather poor seamen, so the possibility of them crossing the Atlantic Ocean so early in history seems rather unlikely.

“The statue seems to have been transported on a ship” explains Mr Neilson. “Most likely, it was on the one we are actually studying, that is scattered near the statue. Unfortunately, the wreck is very badly damaged and decayed, and we have been only been able to determine that it was probably between 20 and 30 meters long and made of cedar. We can’t really confirm however, that it is Egyptian. We will now proceed over the next months, to execute a great variety of different tests to see if we can collect more information concerning either the statue or the ship, to try and confirm it’s origin.”



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