Evil Octopus Strangling The World Becomes Latest US Intelligence Seal

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If you have not had a chance to read my previous article title “5 Most Sinister Corporate Logos” you can read it by  clicking the link.

United States intelligent community spends each year Billions of dollars to eavesdrop on emails, credit card transactions, listening to world leaders phone calls and other things that we might not even be aware of.The US National Reconnaissance Office launched a top-secret surveillance satellite into space Thursday evening and the official emblem for the spy agency’s latest mission is really weird indeed.

The latest spy satellite to be sent into orbit by the NRO can be recognized by its seal: an octopus with furrowed brows that also happens to be wrapping its tentacles around all corners of  the Earth. “Nothing is beyond our reach,” s-1
 

Along with the National Security Agency and more than a dozen others, the NRO is one of 16 federal offices under the directive of DNI James Clapper and is responsible for building and operating the spy satellites used to collect intelligence around the world. This time  the ODNI says the satellite’s payload is mostly classified, but did admit over Twitter that around a dozen mini satellites funded by both the NRO and NASA will be brought along to orbit as well.

You may want to downplay the massive dragnet spying thing right now,” Chris Soghoian, the chief technologist at the American Civil Liberties Union, tweeted Thursday. “This logo isn’t helping.”

According to a top-secret budget document released by Snowden and first reported on in August, the NRO is in the midst of modernizing their signals intelligence, geospatial and  communications system to replace current capabilities.

Looking at the NROL-39 logo, people could be forgiven for mistaking it for a version of the Lovecraftian elder god Cthulhu, who wants to swallow the Earth whole. But that is not the only National Reconnaissance Office emblem with an interesting spin on the space-spying theme: others include Masonic motifs, superhero ones and a few more that, frankly, defy easy classification.

 

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