Documented Medical Practices of Egyptians-Proof Nephilim Exist

UES021-02

We keep being given one particular history of the world, but things keep being discovered that contradict the mainstream version of history we have been taught. In 1862 Edwin Smith, an American Egyptologist in Luxor, Egypt, discovered a papyrus.

It is the oldest known medical document written in the Middle Egyptian hieratic script and harbors 377 lines of text on the front and 92 on the back. It is currently kept at the New York Academy of Sciences.It is under lock and key and no one is allowed near it. Why?

What is so notable is that this is evidence, once again that the egyptians had technology and medical practices as advanced ( at least) as our own. Once again, we must ask ourselves- is this proof that the Nephilim existed?

The papyrus contains surgical practices, diagnoses, treatments and prognoses of 48 neurosurgical and orthopedic cases. Including 27 head injuries cases and six spinal injuries cases —practices far beyond the supposed knowledge of ancient Egypt

paprys

The cases presented in the Smith papyrus are similar to that used by modern physicians. Every case begins with the history of the patient and then moves on to a physical investigation. Patients with untreatable ailments were given sedative care by the surgeon. There is one case in particular that describes a treatment for a dislocated jaw. The interesting part is the practice performed then is the exact same practice we perform today:

“If thou examinest a man having a dislocation in his mandible, shouldst thou find this mouth open and his mouth cannot close for him, thou shouldst put thy thumbs upon the ends of the two rami of the mandible in the inside of his mouth and thy two claws [meaning two groups of fingers] under his chin, and thou shouldst cause them to fall back so they rest in their places.”

pix-top-giants

The papyrus also included the initial descriptions of cerebrospinal fluid, meninges and the surface of the brain. James Breasted, who translated the document into English, explains how the author of the papyrus described his observations,

“Like the modern scientist, he clarifies his terms by comparison of the things they designate with more familiar objects: the convolutions of the brain he likens to the corrugations on metallic slag, and the fork at the head of the rams in the human mandible he describes as like the claw of a two-toed bird; a puncture of the cranium is like a hole broken in the side of a pottery jar, and a segment of the skull is given the name of a turtle’s shell.”



From Around the Web