5 Gross Reasons You Should Never Wear The Same Pair of Shoes Two Days In A Row

There is quite a bit of talk going around concerning wearing the same pair of shoes each day and the negative impact that it has on your feet. Everyone has their favorite pair of shoes, and the reason that they are your favorite could be because they look and feel great when you wear them. Before we uncover whether it is fact or fiction to be wearing those shoes, we need to reveal the health reasons you should not wear the same pair of shoes every single day.

1.The Sweating Feet

Whether you want to believe it or not, your feet sweat in those shoes no matter what precautions you are taking to the contrary. No amount of foot powder or feet antiperspirants can eliminate the fact the feet are going to sweat while trapped inside the shoes all day long. Whether you wear your shoes to exercise, for work, or to just lounge around during the day, your feet are not getting enough air to allow perspiration to evaporate.

When your feet begin to sweat, the shoes will act like a sponge and absorb the perspiration. Each day that you wear your shoes, the salts contained in the sweat begin to break down the footwear more easily. When you alternate between one pair of shoes and another each day, you allow the inside of the shoes to air dry, in a sense evaporating the sweat before it has the chance to significantly break down the composition of the shoes. The more shoes that you own and the more you alternate between then, the longer each individual pair of shoes are going to last you.

2.Dirty Smelling Shoes

When you wear the same pair of shoes each and every day, you are not allowing them adequate time to air out. Most people who work eight hour a day jobs are dressed and ready hours before work, and usually don’t kick off the shoes until they are home for night, ten or more hours later. The shoes sit in a dark hallway or closet until morning, and then your feet go back inside for the long day of work again. This pattern repeats itself five or more times a week, and by the end of the week those shoes can smell pretty ripe.

The shoes are not getting enough time for the salts from your sweat to dry out, so it only takes a very short amount of time before you have significant foot odors coming from the shoes. The excess salts in the shoe material is a breeding ground for nasty smells, and after a while the unpleasant odor will start seeping out of the shoe while at work. To eliminate the growth of bacteria that leads to smelly shoes, place them in the freezer overnight and the bacteria will be killed from the cold temperatures.

3.Increased Chance of Fungal Infection

Each day that you wear the same shoes again and again, the buildup of bacteria from your sweat can lead to a serious fungal infection. The reason for the infection is similar to walking around in the forest barefoot through wet areas for days. The feet never have the opportunity to dry, so you develop skin infections that are a direct result of the feet not being allowed to dry properly. The same happens with shoes. Perhaps you walked through a puddle or in the snow, wore the shoes all day, and although they appeared dry ion the outside, the inside was moist and dark, the perfect breeding grounds for bacteria to thrive.

Each day your socks or bare feet come in contact with the growing bacteria and you wind up developing a very nasty and painful fungal infection. Alternating between different pairs of shoes will allow them to properly dry out so that the next time your feet are inside they are completely dry.

4.Dangers of Sore Feet

Each time you wear that exact pair of shoes, your weight is causing the cushions in the sole to compress. When you wear them day after day, you are pressing down on the same insoles, in the same spots, again and again. It does not take long before that section of the insoles gets matted down, unable to rebound back to the original position. Those padded foot beds need to revert back so that you are not basically walking on the ground without any cushioning.

Source:

fithog.com



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